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Beyond Flipping: Interactive Flipped Instruction with YouTube Annotations

brookhouser.me/video

group notes

Flipping the classroom is great. Flipping with interactive videos is even better.

Here's a video. Written instructions below. 

You will need your favorite screencasting software. If you're using a Mac, Quicktime works. Both Macs and PCs can use TechSmith's software, Snagit. There is a 30-day free trial. 

An iPad is NOT going to cut it for this session. You CAN use a Chromebook if you're willing to use Hangouts On Air to record your screen.

Instructions for creating an interactive YouTube video for more engaging flipped instructional videos.  
  1. Decide what you want to teach.
  2. Make some slides to create the visuals of the video.
  3. Make sure the slides feature at least one multiple choice question to test audience retention. The following slide should show the answer.
  4. Record your screen with your voice narrating. After introducing the questions, give at least three seconds pause before moving on to the next slide. The answer slide should congratulate the student for answering correctly.
  5. Upload that video to YouTube.
  6. Create another YouTube video that tells them that they are wrong. Give them a slide that says, "Click here to review and try again."
  7. Go to the "add annotation" screen.
  8. Add an annotation for each of the possible answers in your question. The annotation belongs in the BEGINNING of the three seconds of silence. 
  9. Each annotation should be a "link."
  10. The "correct" annotation should link to the same video, but at the END of the three seconds of silence. 
  11. The "incorrect" annotations should link to your "WRONG" video.
  12. The wrong video should have an annotation at the end of it that links back to the instruction in the first video.
  13. Now blow us away with your videos!

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